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A to Zed of
Aussie Slang 2015

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Passionate About Photography July and August 2016

Passionate About Photography August and September 2016

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A to Zed of Aussie Slang 2015
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Now available for immediate download as an e-book for $2.99

An updated 2015 glossary of Australian slang. Languages are alive and constantly changing. After the Malaysian airways fight MH17 was shot down in Ukraine in 2014, Australia's Prime Minister threatened to "shirtfront" Russia's President Vladimir Putin at the November G20 meeting of government heads in Brisbane, Australia. Not many people except for ardent Australian Rules Football followers had any idea of what a "shirtfront" is. It is explained along with hundreds of other slang terms in this comprehensive up to date glossary of Australian colloquialisms.

A_to_Zed_of_Aussie_S_Cover_for_Kindle reduced

The Paperback version of

A to Zed of Aussie Slang 2015

 is available from here

The Amazon Kindle version is available for immediate download from the relevant sites and at the relevant costs shown below:

USA, UK, India, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Japan, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, Australia, Holland

Australian English like all other languages being used is a living entity and is constantly changing. Many slang terms used by my parent's generation are infrequently used now. Likewise, the language used by Aussie teenagers today is different from the language I feel comfortable using.

With the internet, television and the globalisation of almost everything, cultures are being influenced by other cultures and many slang terms are now almost universal.

However, we do need to take care when we use language in different cultures, because even the same slang terms can mean different things. Two examples which come to mind are the words "thong" and "fanny". These words have very different meanings in the United States of America and in Australia.

In Australia, the context in which various words are used can totally change the meanings of those words. An example is the word "bastard". The dictionary meaning is "a person born from an unmarried mother". It is used in a derogatory sense in most cultures and can be used that way in Australia also. However, in Australia it can also be used in an almost affectionate way between good friends.

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